Home Seller TipsCraft Workshop Tips Running your own workshop – 7 top tips for hosting a successful craft workshop
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Running your own workshop – 7 top tips for hosting a successful craft workshop

by Clare

Learn how to host a craft workshop with our top 7 tips!

So you’ve decided to get out there and spread your passion for handmade by running a craft workshop. Brilliant! Now, how can you make sure your workshop is a success? We share 7 top tips so you can make yours the best workshop ever!

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1. Be realistic about how much you can achieve in one workshop

Keep in mind how much time you have for your workshop and be realistic about how much you can achieve in that time. Remember that people learn at different speeds and some will take longer to pick up new skills than others. Scale back your expectations, keep it simple and try not to fit too much in.

Consider how many people you can teach at once. If your craft requires you to be very hands-on with your workshop participants then you might want to limit it to a maximum of between 6-10 people, so they all get enough out of it, want to come back again and also recommend you to their friends.

2. Get your workshop pricing right

When working out how much to charge for your workshop, make sure you take into consideration your time, any materials, any overhead costs (venue hire/commission, refreshments, printing), as well as travel expenses.

It’s easy to underestimate how much it will cost to run a workshop and you don’t want to be left out of pocket.

3. Find a great venue

The ideal venue for a workshop would have lots of good lighting, comfortable seats and a relaxing atmosphere. It should be easy to find and travel to, with parking close by if possible. It should also be accessible, so that you can welcome everyone to your workshop.

Often independent shops and cafés are very open to you using their space for workshops, especially if you’re bringing in new customers and promoting their business.

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4. Provide refreshments

Learning a new skill can be thirsty work, so it’s a good idea to provide refreshments for all your participants, whether it be tea and coffee or something a bit stronger!

Your venue will dictate what you can serve but cake always goes down a treat!

5. What is the best day and time for your workshop?

This will depend on your audience, venue and how much time you need. The weekend might be best if you need more than three hours or you’re looking to attract people who are working or looking after children during the day.  Sunday mornings work particularly well, especially if you’re providing bottomless coffee and some delicious pastries!

If your target audience are retired people who are available during the day, a weekday might work just as well, and the good thing here is that it will probably be easier and cheaper to book a venue.

There are also certain times of year that lend themselves well to workshops. September – when the nights draw in and the new academic year begins – is a great time to engage people wanting to learn a new skill to see them through the long winter. January is another peak time for people looking to take up a new hobby and fulfil a New Year resolution.

Generally people are much busier in the summer months, so it’s best to avoid workshops at this time unless they are part of a larger event or have a specific summer theme.

6. Shout about your amazing new workshop!

Once you’ve booked your venue, decided on the date and your workshop content, think about the best way to promote your workshop. Share it on all of your social media profiles, making sure you use the best hashtags to get you found. Facebook seems to be focusing more on regional events recently so that’s a good place to start.

Ask your venue if they could promote it through their networks, and see if there are any local free newspapers or magazines who might include your workshop on their ‘What’s On’ page?

7. Inspire your participants to do more after the workshop ends

Can you leave people with a takeaway from the workshop that will inspire them to continue creating when they get home? It might be a printed handout with instructions, links to suppliers for materials or links to your own ‘how to’ videos on your blog, website or YouTube channel.

And don’t forget to ask people to tag you in their posts on social media, so you can see what they’ve achieved. This also works as great promotion for your next workshop!

Next time, we’ll be sharing our five-step plan to becoming the perfect craft workshop host!

Not sure if you’re quite ready to run your own workshop yet? Read our article on why running your own workshop can be great for you, your local community and your craft business – https://blog.folksy.com/2018/10/10/how-to-run-craft-workshops

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